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Saturday, August 16, 2014

German Infantry Part III

Since Blogger only allows for the tags in a post to be so large, I have had to create yet another post with additional German Infantry figures...

DGN German Infantry - Part I
This is one of the weakest sets. The figures are under scale and the detail is not what it could be. For instance, the shape of the helmets is definitely not the distinctive German style. While they did try to add the ledge at the bottom, it did not turn out quite right. The bipod on the kneeling machine gunner is also quite large and the barrel a bit short. 

DGN German Infantry - Part II
Here you can also see how some of the figures are quite short, particualrly the grenade thrower. The mortar man also poses a bit of a challenge when it comes to getting him to stand straight and not fall over.

DGN German Infantry - Part III
These are the best poses when it comes to head gear I think. Only the sub mgs are a bit on the larger side. Other than that, these figures are fairly decent. This is another set for which I only have 11 poses.

Click here to see some pictures of painted German Infantry.
Here you can see pictures of additional German Infantry figures.
Click here to see German Paratroops in action.
Click here to see German Waffen SS in action.

Saturday, August 9, 2014

DGN "Army Guys" - Toy Soldiers

DGN seems to be a Chinese firm who recently released a series of WWII figures. They come in tubes labeled "Army Guys" and are distributed by a firm named D&D Distributing-Wholesale, Inc. According to Stad's site, DGN stands for Dounghan-Guandong Niunght, although no matches come up when you search for that name. There are 8 such sets of "Army Guys". Each tube contains 17 pieces which translates into about 15 figures (plus or minus 1), a flag, and a base for the flag. Unfortunately what you get in each tube is a random selection of poses, so it might take several tubes to be able to collect all 12 poses for each country. Some of the figures, like the British, seem to be heavily inspired by earlier manufacturers, but aren't clones. Others, like the French, seem to be entirely new poses. A few things that I don't quite like is that most of their weapons seem to be oversized, also some of the figures seem to be a bit short or underscale, and lastly, the material is very light, and feels a bit brittle. However, the fact that they have included some nationalities which tend to be under-represented is a nice plus. Having said that, let's get to it and take a closer look at them.

DGN British Infantry - Part I
As you can see, this set is heavily influenced by the British 8th Army Matchbox figures. However, when you compare them side by side, you realize that they are originally sculpted, but there is not mistaking that the sculptur tried to replicate the original. 

DGN British Infantry - Part II
The weapons are definitely different. Some of them are larger, and some of them are missing the bayonet at the tip of the rifle, which several of the Matchbox guys have. 

DGN British Infantry - Part III
Overall, this is a pretty solid set. Not very original, but fairly decent if you were not aware of the Matchbox figures. Good poses and good level of detail.

DGN French Infantry - Part I
This is a nice set to have given the scarcity of French infantry figures. The man firing the bazooka is an interesting pose. I don't believe that this weapon existed at the early stages of the war, when the French troops still wore their original uniforms. Nonetheless, it is a welcome addition my the Frech army, as they would otherwise not have such a heavy weapon.

DGN French Infantry - Part II
As you can tell, the poses are also varied and decent. The scale of the weapons is my main concern with them. For instance, look at the size of the Bren gun's magazine, or the grenade that the man on the left is holding.  

DGN French Infantry - Part III
The prone man firing the machine gun the worst case of how some of the weapons are out of proportion. In this case, the gun is almost as long as the man's body. Partly, this is also because his lower body is shorter than it should be. As far as the bugler, he seems more adequate for a WWI set, which makes me wonder if these guys were copied from a WWI set that I might not be aware of. The uniforms could certainly pass for WWI era dress style. BTW, note that I only have 11 poses. There might be a 12th pose out there, but these are all I got after buying two tubes. 

DGN German Infantry - Part I
This is one of the weakest sets. The figures are under scale and the detail is not what it could be. For instance, the shape of the helmets is definitely not the distinctive German style. While they did try to add the ledge at the bottom, it did not turn out quite right. The bipod on the kneeling machine gunner is also quite large and the barrel a bit short. 

DGN German Infantry - Part II
Here you can also see how some of the figures are quite short, particualrly the grenade thrower. The mortar man also poses a bit of a challenge when it comes to getting him to stand straight and not fall over.

DGN German Infantry - Part III
These are the best poses when it comes to head gear I think. Only the sub mgs are a bit on the larger side. Other than that, these figures are fairly decent. This is another set for which I only have 11 poses.

DGN US Infantry - Part I
The US Infantry seems to be among the best -if not the best- proportioned of all these sets. Again, some of the figures seem to be inspired by Matchbox figures, although they are still originals. 

DGN US Infantry - Part II
These guys do not have the over-sized weapon problem that the other sets do. I particularly like the machine gunner here.

DGN US Infantry - Part III
See the strong resemblance with the Matchbox GIs?

DGN Italian Infantry - Part I
This is a welcome addition to the scarce WWII Italian figures available up to date. The prone guy has a strong resemblance with the Airfix guy. The others seem to be originals. The mortar guy is a bit hard to stand as it keeps falling over. 

DGN Italian Infantry - Part II
The officer in this set clearly resembles the Airfix officer. The other guys also appear to be originals. The head dress that they wear matches that of the Waterloo 1815 El Alamein Division. The weakest figure here is the prone machine gunner. His left arm is too short and he does not rest on the ground entirely.

DGN Italian Infantry - Part III
The rest of the set. Not much to criticize here. These guys appear to be Bersaglieri, based on the plume that they have on the left side of their helmets.

DGN Japanese Infantry - Part I
This set seems to be a fairly unique set in the sense that only a few of the figures seem to be influenced by prior sets -Airfix in this case. A few of the other poses have a very vague resemblance to the ESCI guys, but it is questionable. The rest of the poses seem to be originals. The man on the right for instance is a sniper which will be a good addtion to my Japanese army since I do not have any so far. 

DGN Japanese Infantry - Part II
The size of the figures is also a bit on the shorter side, but considering that the Japanese were also smaller, this does not seem to be an issue. Here we have a couple of Airfix look-alikes. 

DGN Japanese Infantry - Part III
Another two more Airfix-like figures, and two originals. I just wish these guys were displaying a bit more action. I am not a big fan of guy who are just standing around. 

DGN Soviet Infantry - Part I
These guys all seem to be originals as far as I can tell. They are a fairly decent set in terms of detail and proportions. Some of the poses are a bit 'funny' though. For instance, the guy on the left is aiming too low. I suppose he could be placed in the upper floor of a building. The other guys in this first picture are OK. In fact, I quite like the two on the right. 

DGN Soviet Infantry - Part II
My favorite guy here is the officer. Very nicely sculpted and good body language. The grenade thrower's arm is posed at a funny angle, but other than that, these four guys make a nice batch.

DGN Soviet Infantry - Part III
These are my least favorite poses. I don't really like how they are standing. The best part is that they are all carrying sub mgs, but I don't think they would manage to survive a charge across no-man's land standing that way. 

DGN Chinese Infantry
This was a huge disappointment. I really felt cheated when I received these figures. All they are is a neon green version of the Soviet figures. What made them believe that they would pass as Chinese? Not worth of reviewing at any closer level of detail. 

Saturday, August 2, 2014

Werner - Toy Soldiers

Werner was an American toy soldier manufacturer based out of Illinois. It does not seem like they produced any original sculpting. Instead they cloned (or licensed?) the figures from other manufacturers. For instance, their GIs are based on the Ideal GIs and their Cowboys and Indians are based on the TimMee figures. Also according to the Toy Soldier HQ site, an ex TimMee employee might have been involved at Werner, which also explains why the plastic used for their GIs is so similar to that of TimMee's. It is unclear to me whether they released any additional sets and the exact period when they were active.
 
Werner 60mm US Infantry
These are some figures that I recently discovered. As you can see, they have a strong resemblance to the Ideal GIs, however these guys come with bases, which makes it easier to stand them. The base also comes stamped with the brand name Werner, so that establishes that they were released by a different manufacturer. Only the man standing with the bazooka is not present in the 16 Ideal poses. I have seen pictures with a 7th pose, a man charging/leaning forward with his weapon at the waist, also present in the Ideal set.

And Yet Even More GIs

Because Blogger does not allow more than 20 labels in one post I am forced to split the posts with many sets into several posts... This is the last one of the GI series. For now...

Safari 60mm GIs - Part I
This is a pretty nice set all in all. The sculpting detail is good and the poses are well done. The only thing that I think could be done better is the painting. Other than the faces, which are fairly decent, the rest of the figure is barely painted. I think I will need to give them a paint over. Note also the other less common feature of these figures, they come without bases.

 Safari 60mm GIs - Part II
This is a comparison picture next to a 54mm TSSD figure. As you can see, the Safari figures are not too much larger. Keep in mind however that TSSD makes their figures on the larger side of 54mm, with a thick base that makes them even taller.

DGN US Infantry - Part I
The US Infantry seems to be among the best -if not the best- proportioned of all these sets. Again, some of the figures seem to be inspired by Matchbox figures, although they are still originals. 

DGN US Infantry - Part II
These guys do not have the over-sized weapon problem that the other sets do. I particularly like the machine gunner here.

DGN US Infantry - Part III
See the strong resemblance with the Matchbox GIs?

If you would like to see some painted GIs, click here.
Click here to see More unpainted GIs.
Here's a post of the GI's breaking out of Normady.
And here is another post with GIs defending an italian farmhouse.

Safari - Toy Soldiers

Safari Ltd is an American producer of plastic figures. They got started out of Miami, Florida, although they also have an office in Hong Kong as hinted by the Limited designation. They have been around in business since the early 80s, and their initial focus was on wild life (hence the name), dinosaur and sea life figures. Over time, they have developed a much larger range, although they are still more heavily weighted towards non-military figures such as farm animals, pets, etc. But they do have a few soldier sets such as civil war, knights, pirates, and one set of WWII GIs. They are 60mm+ in size though. While the brand might not be that well known, their packaging method is. This is the company that sells their figures in what they call 'Toobs', which is a cylinder of clear/hard plastic holding about 6-10 figures. The quality and sculpting of their figures is good, so I really hope that we see additional sets being released representing other nationalities and service branches. For now, lets take a look at the GI set that they offer.

Safari 60mm GIs - Part I
This is a pretty nice set all in all. The sculpting detail is good and the poses are well done. The only thing that I think could be done better is the painting. Other than the faces, which are fairly decent, the rest of the figure is barely painted. I think I will need to give them a paint over. Note also the other less common feature of these figures, they come without bases.

Safari 60mm GIs - Part II
This is a comparison picture next to a 54mm TSSD figure. As you can see, the Safari figures are not too much larger. Keep in mind however that TSSD makes their figures on the larger side of 54mm, with a thick base that makes them even taller.

Saturday, April 5, 2014

Introducing the Soviet Partisans

The term Partisan applies to those units which operated behind enemy lines in order to disrupt the German war effort. Their operations primarily targeted the infrastructure supporting the German front units, such as railways, rail stock, supplie depots, bridges, communication centers, etc. and even though their main goal was not to fight the Germans head-on, they did kill a good share of rearguard troops and collaborationist units. Initially the partisan units originated from regular Soviet troops left behind by the rapidly advancing front, and operated in an independent manner. Gradually, the German occupation and the brutal treatment of the local population -deportations, use as slave labor, confiscation of food in the middle of winter, etc.- turned many civilians, towards the partisan ranks. The German reprisals against this movement did not only target the partisans themselves -who were regularly executed-, but often included the execution of civilians, sometimes as many as 100 for each German death. The partisans responded in kind, by not just killing Germans, but sometimes mutilating them in horrible ways. As of mid 1942, the Soviet Central command started to play a role in coordinating and supplying the partisan units. The supplies not only consisted of weapons and material -including badly needed communications equipment-, but also included specially selected and trained troops as well as NKVD members to lead and reinforce the partisans. Many of these were air dropped behind enemy lines, but many also flowed through a 40km wide land corridor known as the Vitsyebsk Gate which was open for a good portion of 1942. Partisan operations gradually became more than local harassments and by 1943, they were well coordinated and timed operations. For instance, during the Kursk offensive, the suppy difficulties created by the operations in the German rear played a very important role in halting the summer offensive. Over 100,000 partisans participated in the raids at this time. Another measure of the partisans success is the fact that as the Soviet Army advanced many partisan units were ordered to continue to move west so that they could remain in occupied territory and continue to operate. This was important not just because of the direct impact on the infrastructure, but also because of the large number of German troops which were required to guard the supply lines and to hunt the partisans. Most of those partisans which were liberated by the advancing Soviets joined the regular army and kept fighting on. At the height of the war, over 500,000 partisans were active across the whole length of the front. After the war ended, partisans were treated not much better than Soviet soldiers who had allowed themselves to be taken prisoners, and underwent interrogations by the NKVD, with many of them being sent to labor camps. This is not surprising as experienced guerrilla forces would have been a danger to the Stalin's regime. In terms of toy soldiers, they are not really well represented, however there is one recent set which has done a nice job at depicting the variety of backgrounds in the Soviet Partisan ranks. Let's take a look.

Engineer Bassevich Soviet Partisans - Part I
A unique set by Engineer Bassevich. The depiction of these partisans strikes a nice balance between showing them as civilians and soldiers. For example, the guys above might have just joined the partisan unit and are still wearing some of their original clothes and their weaponry is lacking automatic firing. 

UPDATE: I had the good fortune of getting some input from Alex, the man behind Engineer Bassevich's figures and he supplied me with a description for some of the figures. For instance, these guys could be used as members of the factory workers Fighter Battalion at Stalingrad during the summer of 1942. If you take out the guy throwing the grenade, who is holding the automatic weapon, they could also be used as members of the People's Militia Division, during the summer of 1941. Automatic weapons were not avaialble outside of the professional army during the earlier part of the war.

Engineer Bassevich Soviet Partisans - Part II
These guys however are more rugged. they could be regular army troops who got left behind the enemy lines and joined the partisans, giving them some badly needed training and leadership. As far as the quality of the figures go, I am quite pleased with this set. They don't have any flashing, and the plastic used to make them feels more dense, making them feel a bit more robust. The level of detail in the sculpting as you can see, is really great.

UPDATE: Thanks to Engineer Bassevich we now know a bit more about the source of inspiration for these figures. The man in the middle is the legendary Sydir Kovpak, leader of the partisan units in the greater Ukraine-Belarus area -see picture below-. He was officially recognized by the Soviet military command and awareded the rank of Major General. The man on the right represents Pyotr Vershigora, who was Kovpak's second in command and eventually also rose to the rank of Major General. 

Here is a picture of Major General Sydir Kovpak, partisan leader in the greater Ukraine-Belarus area

Engineer Bassevich Soviet Partisans - Part III
These guys are probably a mix of civilians and ex-soldiers, but have been in the Partisan ranks long enough to have more sophisticated clothes and equipment. A very interesting touch is the kid in the middle, holding a captured German sub-machine gun. I actually saw a picture of such a kid, dressed very much the same way, which was surely the inspiration for the pose. 

UPDATE from Engineer Bassevich: The guy on the right, would have belonged to the division of the People's Militia. Maybe a former teacher. He can be used in the Battle of Moscow, along with soldiers from set number 1. The man on the left could have been a regular army officer left behind the enemy lines after his unit was encircled and then he joined the partisans.

Introducing the Italian Black Shirts

The Italian Black Shirts or Camicie Nere were the paramilitary branch of of Benito Mussolini's Fascist Party. Their official name was the Voluntary Militia for National Security. They were analogous to the Brown Shirts in Germany -which were actually modeled after the Black Shirts themselves-, providing the necessary muscle to keep Mussolini's political adversaries at bay as well as labor unions representing the interests of factory workers and peasants. They were established shortly after WWI with many former soldiers joining their ranks and Mussolini as their Commander in Chief. Their uniforms were inspired by those of the Arditi, the daring Italian shock troops of WWI. By the time Mussolini came to power in 1922 there were over 200,000 of them. When war broke out, many of them were formed into actual fighting units. Some saw action as early as the Spanish Civil War. Some also fought in the Ethiopian campaign. During WWII they saw heavy fighting in North Africa, where 3 entire divisions were destroyed. They remained an organized group until the armistice of 1943, when the pro-German government in Northern Italy reestablished the remaining members as the Republican National Guard. 

Atlantic Italian Black Shirts - Part I
This is also a hard set to find and unfortunately I only found some of the figures. However I think I got the most representative ones. At center we have Mussolini himself. To the right a standard bearer and to the left a man carrying a bundle of wooden sticks and an ax. This is called a Fasces and it comes from ancient times. The first to use it were apparently the Etruscans and later on the Romans. The ax symbolized the life and death power of the magistrates and the bundle, the strength which can be achieved through unity.  

Atlantic Italian Black Shirts - Part II
A couple more poses. The two bycicle riders are the same pose. On the back of one of the bikes I sat the figure who is supposed to be driving a motorcycle with a side car. He happpens to be saluting while driving. The motorcycle as well as one more guy who is riding in the side car are missing from my set. BTW, I find this to be one of the better sculpted Atlatic sets. No awkward poses like those you see in some of the other sets like the British Infantry...

Saturday, February 22, 2014

Remco - Toy Soldiers

Remco was an American Toy firm active in the 40's to 60's. They were apparently based out of New Jersey. They specialized in electronic and remote controlled toys and vehicles, hence the name Remco. They also liked to release toys associated with popular TV shows and music groups. Today that seems common, but I suspect that back then that was quite unique. In 1971 they went bankrupt and were taken over by a firm called Azrak Hamway. In terms of toy soldiers, they are known for one set, which was incidental to their line of electric toys. They are from a 1960's toy series called the Hamilton Invaders, which was inspired by TV shows of the time in which giant bugs invade earth. These soldiers were mankind's defenders against the giant insect invaders, not unlike the guys from 'Starship Troopers' in the 90's.

Remco 'Hamilton Invaders' GIs aka Blue Defenders - Part I
These guys are on the larger side of 60mm. The scuplting is fairly good in terms of the level of detail. The poses are also good for most of them. For instance, of the three in this picture, the two on the right are just fine, but there is something about the officer that feels just a bit off. Maybe it is the position of the left elbow...or maybe I am just too picky.

Remco 'Hamilton Invaders' GIs aka Blue Defenders - Part II
Here are the other 3 poses. Again, some of the poses are better than the others. The grenade man in the middle seems a bit awkward. I do like the detail on the weapons though. At any rate, these guys seem to be something of a collectible because not so many of them were made - they were only released along with those insect playsets. And those bugs are even more of a priced rarity. I recently saw one listed for about 3,000 usd... That's a bit outrageous if you ask me!

Click here to see a post about other GIs
Click here to see some more GIs
And even more GIs
Click here to see a post about GIs in action
Click here to see a post about US Armor

Sunday, February 16, 2014

Introducing the French Navy

The French Navy, aka 'the Royale' was officialy established in the early 17th century and was historically locked in a rivalry with the British Royal Navy and also fought some conflicts against the Dutch and the Spanish. At the onset of the Second World War, the French Navy weighed 800,000 tonnes and was ranked 4th in the world along with the Italian, after the British, American, and Japanese navies. Up to the summer of 1940, it participated in operations against Germany in Norway, the Mediterranean and the Dunkirk evacuation. After the armistice, the British were seriously concerned about the possibility that the French ships might fall in German hands. Many went willingly to the allied side, or were boarded by the British while in port, and later became the Free French Navy. Some did not want to join, particularly those based out of the Senegalese port Dakar, and they remained part of the Vichy forces After a series of ultimatums, the Royal Navy engaged them, sinking several vessels in July of 1940. Over 1200 French sailors died. The Vichy navy remained hostile for the next two years, until November of '42 when seeing the success of Operation Torch -the North African invasion- unfold, they switched sides. The Germans quickly tried to take over the remaining ships at Toulon, but the French sailors scuttled most of them or fled to allied ports. The Free French Navy continued to fight alongside the allies through the Normandy invasion and the landings in southern France. Once the European ports were recaptured by the allies, the French Navy did not see any more significant action. By the end of the war only half of its original tonnage remained. As far as toy soldier figures, Starlux, a French firm has given us a few poses to consider. Let's check them out. 

Starlux French Navy
A couple of  French sailors. I only have two as I got them from that batch of mixed figures. They are wearing their summer uniforms and the distinctive cap -the 'Bachi' bonnet- with the red decoration on top. The poses are not very exciting, but the figures are still unique as there are no other French Navy sailors that I am aware of.

Click here to see other Starlux figures
Click here to see the French Infantry soldiers
Click here to see the French Alpine Troops

Introducing the Frogmen

Combat swimmers and combat divers have been a part of military operations for centuries. Swimmers aid themselves with breathing devices such as snorkels -hollow bone or grass in anitquity-, while divers make use of more advanced technology, such as rebreathers or scuba tanks. The difference between a rebreather and a scuba system is that the rebreather does not release any air, and instead filters our the CO2 and replenishes the oxygen in a closed circuit. The scuba system does release air and is therefore easier to detect. Modern frogmen date back to a couple years before WWII, when Italy formed the Decima Flottiglia MAS aka Xª MAS (i.e.Tenth Assult Boat Fleet). This was a commando type unit of seamen who would conduct raids using speed boats as well as manned torpedoes to infiltrate port facilities. A submarine or larger surface ship would bring the unit within operational range and offload the attackers and their vehicles. The speed boats would be aimed at the enemy ships and the crew would jump into the water shortly before impact. The manned torpedoes were used as transport to get next to the ships, where explosive charges could be attached. The swimming part came later, when trying to make the escape. If they did manage to escape, the return trip home usually involved a lengthy journey ove land. This were risky missions and in a large number of them, the divers were either captured or killed, with the missions succeeding about only half of the times. However, the disproportionate damage that they inflicted on the allied Navies justified the risks and the cost. Most of the Italian divers operated in the Mediterranean theater, although some of the speedboats were used by the Germans in the Sevastopol area. All other major participants in WWII followed the lead of the Italians and developed equivalent units during the course of the war. After Italy joined the allies, the Italian frogmen helped the British improve their Frogmen units, while the members of the Xª MAS  who remained with the Germans were used primarily on land operations. As far as underwater combat is concerned, until a decade or two ago, combat divers were mainly equipped with a knife and it was not really common to deploy other divers against incoming frogmen. Use of nets and other defensive measures were simpler and more effective to implement. Only recently have weapons been developed which are capable of firing short metal rods accurately and with enough range to make them practical to use underwater at a safe distance from the enemy. In terms of model figures there not too many, but enough to staff a small commando unit and carry out a few raids. Let's take a look. 

Atlantic Frogmen - Part I
A rather unique set by Atlantic. I am not sure what country they actually represent. Given the manufacturer there's a good chance that they are Italian. Since I don't have the manned torpedo which came with the set, I have placed all three of these frogmen on a raft getting ready to dive, however the two on the left are actually supposed to be riding on top of a torpedo. Hard to tell if these guys are wearing rebreathers or scuba gear. 

Atlantic Frogmen - Part II
The rest of the set are 4 divers with different tools and equipment used during their missions. What is quite interesting is that each of them is mounted on top of a base representing a variety of sea plants or corals. This allows them to 'float' as if they were really diving. A nice sculpting touch that allows the figures to be placed 'off the ground' when playing with them.

Atlantic Frogmen - Part III
So I managed to find the missing torpedo. And in doing so I also discovered that these figures were also made in this bright orange color. Not my favorite so it will be a great candidate to get painted. From pictures that I've seen, the torpedo seems to be a bit on the shorter side, compared to the real ones, but it is good enough to illustrate the point of how the divers 'rode' into their missions. Interstingly enough, this other set had the torpedo, but was missing the raft. I wonder if the sets came with either one or the other...

Lone Star Frogmen - Part I
A nice and interesting set from Lone Star. I don't know what country they represent exactly, and whether they are meant to be WWII or post war figures. As was the case with Lone Star, they were on the generous side in terms of the number of poses in the set. I don't know however if I got them all already.

Lone Star Frogmen - Part II
Unlke the Atlantic divers, these guys don't have any bases to keep them 'off the ground', so they must lie flat on their bellies on the sea floor when diving!

Lone Star Frogmen - Part III
As you might suspect from all the different colors, these actual figures are not originals. They are clones of relatively decent quality. Once they are painted it won't be that noticeable.

Lone Star Frogmen - Part IV
 I believe the original frogmen from Lone Star came with factory paint as did their other sets. Interestingly enough, the paint schem that I have seen shows them wearing only a bathing suit, instead of a full diving suit. If so, I guess these guys would have to be used in the Mediterranean only! I am planning on giving them a full body suit when I paint them...

Ideal Manned-Torpedo Launcher with Divers - Part I
I just found this set while looking for some diver figures. It represents a boat carried a manned torpedo and a diving team. It was supposedly manufactured by Ideal, although I have yet to verify the claim. Still it is a nice little set to give the other divers figures in my army a bit of support. In terms of the nationality that is represented, it is not clear to me, although we could probably designate them as Italians as they were the most active in WWII in this type of operations. 

Ideal Manned-Torpedo Launcher with Divers - Part II
This is the skipper. Note tha the figures have a hole in the base which allows them to be attached to the boat. This is a nice feature if you actually deploy your boat in real water, which will keep the figures from falling over. 

Ideal Manned-Torpedo Launcher with Divers - Part III
One of the divers about to jump in. 

Ideal Manned-Torpedo Launcher with Divers - Part IV
The other diver taking in the view.

Ideal Manned-Torpedo Launcher with Divers - Part V
This is the only figure which is actually diving. I made him 'hold on' to the side of the boat to get a better angle for the shot. 

Ideal Manned-Torpedo Launcher with Divers - Part VI
The manned torpedo deployed in the water, with its diver riding it into action. The lever on the front of the torpedo is actually a crank which turns and twists a rubberband which makes the propeller turn when it is released. Nice mechanism, which again shows that this set was really meant to be deployed in water. 

Ideal Manned-Torpedo Launcher with Divers - Part VII
Manned-torpedo rider from the back.

Ideal Manned-Torpedo Launcher with Divers - Part VIII
This shot shows the ramp from which the manned-torpedo can be launched. 

Unknown Frogmen - Part I
Here are a few more diver poses. I don't really know who made them. They are from a set made in China, clearly clones of some other earlier figures, and they probably represent more modern divers, given their equipment. The man in the left for instance is holding and underwater camera. 

Unknown Frogmen - Part II
I like these two posese because unlike most of the other diver figures that I have found, these guys are not moving horizontally, but rather floating in an upright position as one would do when observing the surroundings or when getting ready for some underwater hand to hand combat.

Unknown Frogmen - Part III
The two poses on the left seem to be copies of two guys already listed in the LoneStar section. The man on the right must be from that same set, as his diving gear looks just the same. This BTW, makes me wonder if I have all the figures listed under the Lone Star section properly identified, as I just realized that the tanks on some of those figures are smaller...

Click here to see other Lone Star figures
Click here to see other Atlantic figures